Good Red Wine

Good Red Wine

3 Regions The world’s wine regions are favorite vacation destinations, as any visitor to California’s Napa and Sonoma valleys will attest. But you can go around the wine world by just going around the corner to your local wine store. Here are the top wine-producing regions. Argentina Argentina’s wines are being discovered by the United States. Most Argentine wines come from the country’s Mendoza region, in the West. Like Chile, Argentina produces a great deal of wine in the biggest selling varietals–chardonnay and cabernet. But even more than Chile, Argentina is increasingly producing less-familiar varietals that are distinctive to the country, or at least flourish there. The best example is malbec (see Red wines), but there’s also torrontés (see white wines) and bonarda (another red). Australia Australia is the biggest force in New World wines. It has a reputation for value. Like other New World producers, Australia is furnishing more higher-end wines to the U.S. market. Specialties include shiraz and chardonnay, which are widely grown, and merlot, cabernet, sauvignon blanc, and others. The giant Australian producer Yellow Tail produces a dazzling range of varietals, many of which have done well in our tests. California California has growing competition for American wine palates, but the Golden State is still the single greatest source of the nation’s wine. California’s signature grapes are the most popular white and red varietals in the U.S.—namely, chardonnay (sometimes in the more woody and buttery style for the varietal) and merlot (typically in a big and bold style). Some California chardonnays, especially, fare well in our recommendations. But California bottles show up in virtually all of our tests, including those for sauvignon blanc, pinot grigio, merlot, and pinot noir. Chile Chile is the biggest exporter of wine to the U.S. among South American countries. While most Chilean imports cost $10 or less per bottle, more premium Chilean wines are emerging, with reserve bottles from the big vineyards such as Concha y Toro. Dominant varietals here include cabernet and chardonnay, though Chile also has a reputation for some fine sauvignon blancs. In addition, more of the country’s distinctive varietals are coming in to the U.S., notably carménère. France France is perhaps the most famous wine country in history and the role model for many of the New World’s wines. As such, French wines continue to command some of the highest prices in the world. French wines, such as those from Bordeaux, tend toward blends more than wines from some other regions and are therefore hard to compare side-by-side with varietal wines. It’s more difficult to identify the varietals in French wines, which tend to be named for their region, rather than for the grape. Italy Italy boasts a dazzling array of native wine varietals, more of which are making their way to wine stores in the U.S. Most of the Italian wines we’ve tested have been in two such varietals, pinot grigio and prosecco. Italy’s pinot grigios tend to be dry, light, and tart. Prosecco is a sparkling wine that’s simpler and less austere than most sparkling wines, with softer bubbles and generally more fruitiness. New Zealand New Zealand, which has emerged more recently than Australia, has a reputation built mostly on its sauvignon blanc (especially from the country’s Marlborough area), Yet New Zealand is also growing other wines, especially pinot noir in the country’s cooler regions, the best of which are beginning to gain some acclaim, but not on the same level as its sauvignon blancs. Spain Spanish wines are among the best values in wine today, even though Spain’s greatest wines can cost hundreds of dollars. Spain produces a host of wines that offer high quality, often at very reasonable prices. Spain’s varietals tend to be less well known in the U.S.–there’s very little Spanish chardonnay, cabernet, or sauvignon blanc, for example. Instead, Spain’s wines tend to emphasize the country’s traditional varietals, including tempranillo and garnacha (grenache) in reds, and whites that include albariño and verdejo. Washington State The State of Washington is a relatively new wine-growing area that provides many wines that offer decent (or better) quality at a reasonable price. Offerings from Columbia Crest and Hogue, two major producers, have often shown up in our recommendations in varietals that include chardonnay, riesling, merlot, and cabernet sauvignon.
good red wine 1

Good Red Wine

Regions The world’s wine regions are favorite vacation destinations, as any visitor to California’s Napa and Sonoma valleys will attest. But you can go around the wine world by just going around the corner to your local wine store. Here are the top wine-producing regions. Argentina Argentina’s wines are being discovered by the United States. Most Argentine wines come from the country’s Mendoza region, in the West. Like Chile, Argentina produces a great deal of wine in the biggest selling varietals–chardonnay and cabernet. But even more than Chile, Argentina is increasingly producing less-familiar varietals that are distinctive to the country, or at least flourish there. The best example is malbec (see Red wines), but there’s also torrontés (see white wines) and bonarda (another red). Australia Australia is the biggest force in New World wines. It has a reputation for value. Like other New World producers, Australia is furnishing more higher-end wines to the U.S. market. Specialties include shiraz and chardonnay, which are widely grown, and merlot, cabernet, sauvignon blanc, and others. The giant Australian producer Yellow Tail produces a dazzling range of varietals, many of which have done well in our tests. California California has growing competition for American wine palates, but the Golden State is still the single greatest source of the nation’s wine. California’s signature grapes are the most popular white and red varietals in the U.S.—namely, chardonnay (sometimes in the more woody and buttery style for the varietal) and merlot (typically in a big and bold style). Some California chardonnays, especially, fare well in our recommendations. But California bottles show up in virtually all of our tests, including those for sauvignon blanc, pinot grigio, merlot, and pinot noir. Chile Chile is the biggest exporter of wine to the U.S. among South American countries. While most Chilean imports cost $10 or less per bottle, more premium Chilean wines are emerging, with reserve bottles from the big vineyards such as Concha y Toro. Dominant varietals here include cabernet and chardonnay, though Chile also has a reputation for some fine sauvignon blancs. In addition, more of the country’s distinctive varietals are coming in to the U.S., notably carménère. France France is perhaps the most famous wine country in history and the role model for many of the New World’s wines. As such, French wines continue to command some of the highest prices in the world. French wines, such as those from Bordeaux, tend toward blends more than wines from some other regions and are therefore hard to compare side-by-side with varietal wines. It’s more difficult to identify the varietals in French wines, which tend to be named for their region, rather than for the grape. Italy Italy boasts a dazzling array of native wine varietals, more of which are making their way to wine stores in the U.S. Most of the Italian wines we’ve tested have been in two such varietals, pinot grigio and prosecco. Italy’s pinot grigios tend to be dry, light, and tart. Prosecco is a sparkling wine that’s simpler and less austere than most sparkling wines, with softer bubbles and generally more fruitiness. New Zealand New Zealand, which has emerged more recently than Australia, has a reputation built mostly on its sauvignon blanc (especially from the country’s Marlborough area), Yet New Zealand is also growing other wines, especially pinot noir in the country’s cooler regions, the best of which are beginning to gain some acclaim, but not on the same level as its sauvignon blancs. Spain Spanish wines are among the best values in wine today, even though Spain’s greatest wines can cost hundreds of dollars. Spain produces a host of wines that offer high quality, often at very reasonable prices. Spain’s varietals tend to be less well known in the U.S.–there’s very little Spanish chardonnay, cabernet, or sauvignon blanc, for example. Instead, Spain’s wines tend to emphasize the country’s traditional varietals, including tempranillo and garnacha (grenache) in reds, and whites that include albariño and verdejo. Washington State The State of Washington is a relatively new wine-growing area that provides many wines that offer decent (or better) quality at a reasonable price. Offerings from Columbia Crest and Hogue, two major producers, have often shown up in our recommendations in varietals that include chardonnay, riesling, merlot, and cabernet sauvignon.
good red wine 2

Good Red Wine

The world’s wine regions are favorite vacation destinations, as any visitor to California’s Napa and Sonoma valleys will attest. But you can go around the wine world by just going around the corner to your local wine store. Here are the top wine-producing regions. Argentina Argentina’s wines are being discovered by the United States. Most Argentine wines come from the country’s Mendoza region, in the West. Like Chile, Argentina produces a great deal of wine in the biggest selling varietals–chardonnay and cabernet. But even more than Chile, Argentina is increasingly producing less-familiar varietals that are distinctive to the country, or at least flourish there. The best example is malbec (see Red wines), but there’s also torrontés (see white wines) and bonarda (another red). Australia Australia is the biggest force in New World wines. It has a reputation for value. Like other New World producers, Australia is furnishing more higher-end wines to the U.S. market. Specialties include shiraz and chardonnay, which are widely grown, and merlot, cabernet, sauvignon blanc, and others. The giant Australian producer Yellow Tail produces a dazzling range of varietals, many of which have done well in our tests. California California has growing competition for American wine palates, but the Golden State is still the single greatest source of the nation’s wine. California’s signature grapes are the most popular white and red varietals in the U.S.—namely, chardonnay (sometimes in the more woody and buttery style for the varietal) and merlot (typically in a big and bold style). Some California chardonnays, especially, fare well in our recommendations. But California bottles show up in virtually all of our tests, including those for sauvignon blanc, pinot grigio, merlot, and pinot noir. Chile Chile is the biggest exporter of wine to the U.S. among South American countries. While most Chilean imports cost $10 or less per bottle, more premium Chilean wines are emerging, with reserve bottles from the big vineyards such as Concha y Toro. Dominant varietals here include cabernet and chardonnay, though Chile also has a reputation for some fine sauvignon blancs. In addition, more of the country’s distinctive varietals are coming in to the U.S., notably carménère. France France is perhaps the most famous wine country in history and the role model for many of the New World’s wines. As such, French wines continue to command some of the highest prices in the world. French wines, such as those from Bordeaux, tend toward blends more than wines from some other regions and are therefore hard to compare side-by-side with varietal wines. It’s more difficult to identify the varietals in French wines, which tend to be named for their region, rather than for the grape. Italy Italy boasts a dazzling array of native wine varietals, more of which are making their way to wine stores in the U.S. Most of the Italian wines we’ve tested have been in two such varietals, pinot grigio and prosecco. Italy’s pinot grigios tend to be dry, light, and tart. Prosecco is a sparkling wine that’s simpler and less austere than most sparkling wines, with softer bubbles and generally more fruitiness. New Zealand New Zealand, which has emerged more recently than Australia, has a reputation built mostly on its sauvignon blanc (especially from the country’s Marlborough area), Yet New Zealand is also growing other wines, especially pinot noir in the country’s cooler regions, the best of which are beginning to gain some acclaim, but not on the same level as its sauvignon blancs. Spain Spanish wines are among the best values in wine today, even though Spain’s greatest wines can cost hundreds of dollars. Spain produces a host of wines that offer high quality, often at very reasonable prices. Spain’s varietals tend to be less well known in the U.S.–there’s very little Spanish chardonnay, cabernet, or sauvignon blanc, for example. Instead, Spain’s wines tend to emphasize the country’s traditional varietals, including tempranillo and garnacha (grenache) in reds, and whites that include albariño and verdejo. Washington State The State of Washington is a relatively new wine-growing area that provides many wines that offer decent (or better) quality at a reasonable price. Offerings from Columbia Crest and Hogue, two major producers, have often shown up in our recommendations in varietals that include chardonnay, riesling, merlot, and cabernet sauvignon.

Good Red Wine

Good Red Wine
Good Red Wine
Good Red Wine
Good Red Wine